Indigenous Australian man with his adult daughter against a grey background

We acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the first Australians and recognise their culture, history, diversity and their deep connection to the land. We acknowledge the past and are strongly committed to improving the lives, and upholding the rights, of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You Be You empowered by Anglicare Southern Queensland acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands on which our services now stand. We pay our respect to Elders – past, present and emerging – and acknowledge the important role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in caring for their own communities.

We recognise the distinct rights and perspectives of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly the right of children to be raised in culture, community and family.

Anglicare acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities have suffered significant violations of their human rights and these violations continue to impact their daily lives. Anglicare acknowledges the profound grief, suffering and loss caused by the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, their community and their culture and we continue to be committed to ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s cultural identity and relationships with their families and communities are maintained.


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Noel - Anglicare Cultural Support Worker

All Aboriginal People are Traditional Owners, not all Aboriginal People know their Traditional Country.

Maintaining connection to country

Our cultural support workers play a vital role and are committed in ensuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who are in our out-of-home care keep connected to their family, kin, community and culture.

Noel Doyle is one of our cultural support workers and has the important role of assisting all young people in care to identify, verify and connect with their traditional country and that the country identified by Queensland Child Safety is correct.

He investigates by talking to key people within the young person’s life, like their mother, carer, grandparents and close family friends to build their family tree.  

“My aim is to connect a young person to their great great great grandparent and beyond,” Noel said.  

“With the naming and identification of a great great great grandparent, I can then go and view their native title extract to view a list of the identified apical ancestor."

“The great great great grandparent surname should match up with an identified apical ancestor, when I find this match I am able to verify and make connection to country.”  

Noel said explaining his process of gathering information to non-indigenous carers is important as he brings forward the young person’s language, cultural information, map of country, song, dance, connection to other family members and community.  

“Engaging the carer is crucial to the young person’s development as it will be the carer who will encourage the use of their language, art and culture in daily use,” he said.    

“The connection process and cultural information I provide for each young person is family and cultural knowledge and through the young person’s journey we can build a strong cultural sense of identity, which will build on their self-esteem, pride and emotional wellbeing."

“My drive to bring forward Family & Cultural Knowledge for each young person in care and their carer inspires me to attend work daily.   

“All Aboriginal People are Traditional Owners, not all Aboriginal People know their Traditional Country."

“Through my process each young person will know who they connect through to connect to their Traditional Country.”  

What is a Cultural Support Worker?

Our Cultural Support Workers support non-Indigenous foster carers and staff to better understand the needs of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children in care and to respond in a holistic way that considers family, spiritual, community and individual needs. They work in close partnership with our Child Safety service centres to achieve the young person’s cultural plans. They also assist other team members to better understand Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families and support them toward the best outcomes for our young people in care and at risk.

Can I request an identified Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander worker?

If you, or someone in your family identifies as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, you have the right to request a worker who also identifies as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. If we are unable to provide an identified worker, we will work with you to access additional culturally appropriate services or other local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Services. If you would prefer, we will support you to explore access to an Indigenous Foster and Kinship Care service if one is available in the local area.

What is the Child Placement Principle?

The Child Placement Principle recognises the importance of connections to family, community, culture and country and guides Child Safety legislation, policy and practice. The Child Placement Principle was developed by the Department of Child Safety and SNAICC to guide foster and kinship care organisations like us when making decisions about care for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people. You can read more about the Child Placement Principle here.

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